English 11


Hey, Juniors! It's time for some REMOTE LEARNING!! 

MATERIALS YOU WILL NEED:

An electronic copy of novel The Things They Carried:

https://www.boyertownasd.org/cms/lib/PA01916192/Centricity/Domain/777/TTTC%20Full%20Text%20mariner.pdf

Here's Breaking Bad's Bryan Cranston reading the audiobook:

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=the+things+they+carrried+audiobook&&view=detail&mid=7D7319DEE34DB47FF22C7D7319DEE34DB47FF22C&rvsmid=78A066FAB5CFA439E75B78A066FAB5CFA439E75B&FORM=VDRVRV

The following chart lists all the assignments for the entire novel:


Week of 4/20/20

Read “The Things They Carried”

“The Things They Carried” Vocabulary

“The Things They Carried” Character Chart

“The Things They Carried” Probing Questions:

  1. Why does the author repeatedly reference Ted Lavender’s death throughout the chapter?
  2. Page 21: “ They carried the common secret of cowardice barely restrained, the instinct to run or freeze or hide, and in many respects this was the heaviest burden of all, for it could never be put down, it required perfect balance and perfect posture. They carried their reputations. They carried the soldier’s greatest fear, which was the fear of blushing. Men killed, and died, because they were embarrassed not to. It was what had brought them to the war in the first place, nothing positive, no dreams of glory or honor, just to avoid the blush of dishonor. They died so as not to die of embarrassment…they were too frightened to be cowards.”

In this passage, the author challenges our image of brave soldiers fighting for their country. Why does he do it?


Week of 4/27/20

Glossary of Military Terms in The Things They Carried

Read “Love,” “Spin,” and “On the Rainy River”

“Spin” note: “to put a spin on something” mean to twist a report or story to one's advantage; to interpret an event to make it seem favorable or beneficial to oneself or one's cause.]

“On the Rainy River” Vocabulary

“On the Rainy River” Background: Starting in 1965, Canada became a choice haven for American draft evaders and deserters. Because they were not formally classified as refugees but were admitted as immigrants, there is no official estimate of how many draft evaders and deserters were admitted to Canada during the Vietnam War.

Page 39: O’Brien lists his academic achievements in college to defend his reasoning for why he should not have been drafted: Phi Beta Kappa is an invitation-only university honor society. Graduating summa cum laude is an honor given to the top 1-5% of university students. Grad studies refer to a graduate (post 4-year) program at a highly competitive university like Harvard. Full-ride scholarships pay for the entire program and are also highly competitive.

Page 41: Early in the Vietnam War, drafted individuals could postpone entering the war if they were going to be a graduate student in college. This “deferment” had been cancelled by the time O’Brien was drafted.

Page 41: CO refers to Conscientious Objector. A man can only be reclassified as a conscientious objector if he demonstrates that his opposition to war is based on moral, ethical or religious beliefs, not on political beliefs. The man must be opposed to all war, not only the specific war at hand. If the board members were convinced of his sincerity, they would reclassify him, and the SSS or military would assign him to appropriate duty. Both conscientious objectors and drafted troops are required to spend a set period, called the tour of duty, in active service. Most likely, the tour of duty in a national emergency would be two years.

“Love” Probing Question

The chapter ends with O’Brien promising not to reveal elements of the story that are too personal, yet O’Brien reveals significant personal details. What is his purpose is in revealing this promise?

“Spin” [Note: “to put a spin on something” mean to twist a report or story to one's advantage; to interpret an event to make it seem favorable or beneficial to oneself or one's cause.]

Probing question: A paradox is a seemingly absurd or self-contradictory statement that when investigated may prove to be true. This chapter is a series of paradoxical moments. For example, in one passage, a moment of peace is found in the middle of war. At the same time, a man experiencing too much peace feels violent. A sweet interaction (giving chocolate to a boy with one leg) turns horribly racist, but in another moment, a racist moment (follow the dink) turns into a sweet interaction. What message about war is O’Brien communicating through this series of paradoxes?

“On the Rainy River” Probing Question

At the end of the chapter, O’Brien writes another paradox: “I was a coward. I went to war.” From O’Brien’s perspective, how would dodging the draft and choosing exile in Canada have been morally and emotionally braver than going to war?

Week of 5/4/20

Read “Enemies,” “Friends,” and “How to Tell a True War Story”

Please watch a quick video of me talking about “How to Tell a True War Story”: https://youtu.be/ZpegY47yX9o

“Enemies” Probing Question

In this story, what point is O’Brien making about fear?

“Friends” Probing Question

O’Brien presents us with a moral conundrum: would a true friend kill you if you once asked him to but then changed your mind? Regardless of the outcome, did Dave Jensen make the right choice? Defend your answer with reasons.

“How to Tell a True War Story” Probing Question

This chapter several definitions of a “true war story,” many of them contradictory. What is his purpose for offering characteristics that contradict each other like this?

Week of 5/11/20

Read “The Dentist,” “Sweetheart of the Song Tra Bang,” “Stockings,” and “Church”

“Sweetheart of the Song Tra Bang” Vocabulary

  1. Bedlam: scene of uproar and confusion (archaic: an old-school mental institution)
  2. Mundane: dull; lacking excitement

    “Vietnam was full of strange stories, some improbably, some well beyond that, but the stories that will last forever are those that swirl back and forth across the border between trivia and bedlam, the mad and the mundane.” (85)

  3. Culottes: knee-length trousers cut full to resemble a skirt

    “I swear to God, man she’s got on culottes. White culottes and this sexy pink sweater.” (86)

  4. Rear-echelon: Echelon means rank. Rear-echelon refers to the section of the military in charge of administration and supply.

“You didn’t have to polish your boots or snap off salutes or put up with the usual rear-echelon nonsense.” (87)

“The Dentist” Probing Question: What is O’Brien revealing about macho soldiers like Curt Lemon when he tells the story of Curt making the dentist pull a healthy tooth?

“Sweetheart of the Song Tra Bang” Probing Question

O’Brien makes it clear that the Vietnam War changes people. What is particularly troubling to Rat Kiley and others about how it changed Maryanne? (Consider the gender norms of 1960s America in your answer.)

“Stockings” Probing Question

O’Brien follows up the Sweetheart/Maryanne’s story with a story about the powerful good luck of a pair of nylon stockings, a typically feminine symbol. O’Brien contrasts the fragility and frivolity of the stockings with the powerful protective spell they hold. What is his message about what gives a talisman its power?

“Church” Probing Question

What does the monks’ hand-washing gesture mean? When the monks or Dobbins use the gesture, what is O’Brien telling us about the situation?

Week of 5/18/20

Read “The Man I Killed,” “Ambush,” and “Style”

“The Man I Killed” Probing Question

What is O’Brien’s purpose for developing a detailed fictional backstory for the stranger he killed?

“Ambush” Probing Question

Consider the title of this chapter. Who ambushed whom? How do the differing answers change O’Brien’s responsibility for the soldier’s death?

“Style” Probing Question

In this story, the soldiers do not understand the meaning of the girl’s dance. What message is there in a symbol that does not hold a clear meaning?

Week of 5/25/20

Read “Speaking of Courage,” “Notes,” and “In the Field”

In this section of the novel, Tim O’Brien reveals his self-awareness that he is a writer and storyteller, separate from the Tim O’Brien who was a soldier.

“Speaking of Courage” Note: To fully appreciate the story, when you finish reading “Speaking of Courage,” immediately read the first sentence of “Notes.” Also, please notice that the only people Norman Bowker actually speaks to in the story are the waitress and the intercom at the A&W Drive-in]

“Speaking of Courage” Vocabulary

To bivouac: to make temporary camp out in the open

“Then he would have told about the night they bivouacked in a field along the Song Tra Bong.” (138)

“Speaking of Courage” Probing Question

Not counting having conversations with people who are not present, identify three clues from the text that Tim O’Brien gives us to show us that Norman Bowker is struggling with reintegrating himself into life back home after the war.

“Notes” Vocabulary

Complicity: being involved with others in wrongdoing

“Kiowa, after all, had been a close friend, and for years I've avoided thinking about his death and my own complicity in it.” (154)

“Notes” Probing Question

After so many stories that blur actual events and fiction, Tim O’Brien is very specific about what part of “Speaking of Courage” was factual and what was not. Why are facts so important at this point in the novel? What is the purpose of including this chapter immediately following “Speaking of Courage”?

“In the Field” Note: To fully understand what is happening in “In the Field,” you need to remember the final sentence of “Notes”: “Norman did not experience a failure of nerve that night. He did not freeze up or lose the Silver Star for valor. That part of the story is my own.” Ask yourself who “the young soldier” is in this chapter.

“In the Field” Probing Question

In this story, different characters focus on who is to blame for Kiowa’s death. Based on the textual details that Tim O’Brien provides, an argument can be made that each of them bears a degree of responsibility, but the characters in question blame only themselves. What can we infer that O’Brien is saying about blame?

Week of 6/1/20

Read “Good Form,” “The Field Trip,” and “The Ghost Soldiers”

“Good Form” Probing Question

All of the questions we have thought about during this unit have focused on “author’s purpose.” In this chapter, Tim O’Brien addresses what he hoped to accomplish with this novel. What is his purpose for saying he could answer his daughter in two ways, that he did and did not kill anyone?

“The Field Trip” Probing Question

What is the purpose for the character Tim O’Brien to bury Kiowa’s moccasins where he died?

“The Ghost Soldiers” Probing Questions

  1. Throughout the novel, Tim O’Brien portrays Azar as a despicable character. What is the purpose of partnering the character Tim O’Brien with Azar in this chapter?
  2. What is the author’s message conveyed at the end of the story when, contrasting with how O’Brien wanted to scare Jorgensen, he wants to kill Azar?

Week of 6/8/20

Read “Night Life” and “The Lives of the Dead”

“Night Life” Probing Question

Read the following sentence from the story: “[Rat Kiley] took off his boots and socks, laid out his medical kit, doped himself up, and put a round through his foot.” What is the purpose of the matter of fact, methodical tone of this sentence?

“Lives of the Dead” Probing Question

What is the author’s purpose for including the story of Linda in a novel about the Vietnam War?





Week of 4/20/20

GOAL: Begin The Things They Carried

MATERIALS YOU WILL NEED:

An electronic copy of novel The Things They Carried:

https://www.boyertownasd.org/cms/lib/PA01916192/Centricity/Domain/777/TTTC%20Full%20Text%20mariner.pdf

Here's Breaking Bad's Bryan Cranston reading the audiobook:

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=the+things+they+carrried+audiobook&&view=detail&mid=7D7319DEE34DB47FF22C7D7319DEE34DB47FF22C&rvsmid=78A066FAB5CFA439E75B78A066FAB5CFA439E75B&FORM=VDRVRV

STEP ONE:

Check out me talking to you in a 3-minute video: https://youtu.be/sNN9nUsjLec

STEP TWO:

Check out one or more of these links to Youtube videos about topics related to Vietnam War:

STEP 3:

Review these vocabulary words for Chapter 1 so that you know what they mean when you read them. You will not be tested on these words. 

Read the first chapter, "The Things They Carried."

As you read, keep track of what items, both physical and emotional, each individual character carries on this character chart.

Procedure for weeks to come:

Every week I will assign chapters for you to read, and for each chapter I will ask you to answer (at least) probing question about the AUTHOR'S PURPOSE. Tim O'Brien's intention was not merely to entertain us with war stories, and every chapter was chosen and written with a specific purpose in mind.

As you address each question, there are three requirements:

  • That you write your answer in complete, punctuated, grammatically correct sentences.
  • That every answer be at least 3 sentences long.
  • That to support your answer, you make at least one reference (quoted or paraphrased) to a specific passage in the chapter.

4/20/20  This Week's Probing Questions regarding AUTHOR'S PURPOSE:

Chapter 1 ("The Things They Carried")

  1. Why does the author repeatedly reference Ted Lavender’s death throughout the chapter?

  2. Page 20: “ They carried the common secret of cowardice barely restrained, the instinct to run or freeze or hide, and in many respects this was the heaviest burden of all, for it could never be put down, it required perfect balance and perfect posture. They carried their reputations. They carried the soldier’s greatest fear, which was the fear of blushing. Men killed, and died, because they were embarrassed not to. It was what had brought them to the war in the first place, nothing positive, no dreams of glory or honor, just to avoid the blush of dishonor. They died so as not to die of embarrassment….they were too frightened to be cowards.”

In this passage, the author challenges our image of brave soldiers fighting for their country. Why might he want to do this?

The bottom line:

By next Monday, email me at jpippin-montanez@nkschools.org:

  • Completed Character Chart

  • Answers to 2 probing questions

  • Questions or observations you have about the novel.


Week of 4/13/20

 

Please finish reading Fahrenheit 451, take the F451 Reading Quiz #3 if you have not already done so in class (email me your answers), and finish the reading journal. Email me pics of each page.

Instead of writing an essay on F451, please complete this Warning Theme Worksheet that asks you to think about Bradbury's message and build an argument like you would for an essay. Email me your completed form or a picture of the hand-written form.


Also!
Check out Skyward and see what assignments you are missing! You can email your missing work (if it is not a word document, take a picture of each page) to me at jpippin-montanez@nkschools.org. 

Need to take or retake a VOCABULARY QUIZ? 

I have established the following protocol to do so:

With the understanding that it is impossible for me to assess whether people know definitions or not, I will instead assess how well students can use ten vocabulary words in sentences.

Write an original sentence for each vocabulary word that:

  1. Uses the vocabulary word

  2. Uses the vocabulary word as the correct part of speech (noun, adjective, etc)

  3. Includes enough detail so that the meaning of the word is clear

  4. Is not a sentence I have seen before. This means the sentence

    1. Is NOT the context clue from the book/play

    2. Is NOT a sentence I provided on the vocabulary powerpoint

    3. CANNOT be found on-line when I google it

Please send me an email letting me know that you would like to take a missing vocab quiz or retake a quiz you did not do well on, and I will email you the 10 words I need you to write sentences for. You can send me your sentences via return email.

GG Vocabulary.pptx
F451 Vocab.pptx

GREAT GATSBY work: 

If you need to finish The Great Gatsby packet, here is the link:
_GG Reading Journal.docx
If you want me to grade your work immediately, please scan or take pics of each page and email them to me @ jpippin-montanez@nkschools.org.

If you need to finish your Great Gatsby Essay, here are the requirements:
GG Color essay prompt.doc
Please email me the essay when you are done.

Fahrenheit 451 work: 

Please finish reading the book and complete the packet. No need to come up with 3 quotes for an essay on the quote integration page. Please scan or take pics of your work and email it to me.
Here's the link to the packet and imagery charts:
_ F451 Reading Journal.doc
F451 Dialectical Journal Form - Imagery.doc

If you need to take any of the reading quizzes for F451, here are the links. Please email me your answers:
Part 1: F451 Reading Quiz Part 1.docx
Part 2: F451 Reading Quiz Part 2.docx
Part 3: F451 Reading Quiz Part 3.docx